• Motivation Formula

    Dr. Sprick, in CHAMPS and DSC, has identified a formula for addressing student motivation.  He views motivation as Expectancy x Value.  If you lack either the expectancy that you can do a task or value the outcome, you will not be motivated to try. This document are slides from the motivation training. If you would like a school trained on the motivation formula please email slawless@earlywood.org 

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  • TIME-AWAY Defined by Diana Browning Wright

    "Students with challenging behaviors are at times unwilling or unable to perform assigned tasks. At this point, they may intentionally engage in acting out behaviors in order to be removed from the class, or remain passively unengaged in learning activities (i.e., both can be conceptualized as escape seeking behaviors), or engage in behaviors that interfere with the learning of others around them (i.e., expressing a protest about activities they do not wish to do). In all three situations, the student is not under instructional control (i.e., following the directions of the teacher), nor is he/she under stimulus control (e.g., in the presence of the chair, desk, written assignment student is highly likely to engage in written work behavior). It is impossible to force a completely unwilling student to do an assignment. It is also unacceptable to have students engaging in acting out behaviors in order to escape tasks, or to have students not under instructional control. Not all task-avoiding episodes can be solved by sending the
    student to the office for a ‘disciplinary referral.’ Therefore, a procedure called Time Away may be warranted as a teaching tool to increase the student’s ability to cope with work output demands. A Time Away procedure can be an important component to delineate as a ‘Reactive Strategy’ in behavior plans for ‘behavior impeding learning’ as defined in I.D.E.A. Reauthorization, 1997."

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  • STOIC

    The STOIC approach is from CHAMPS, Dr. Randy Sprick's work.  It defines the variables in a classroom that staff are able to address to make positive changes for the classroom environment. 

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  • Management & Discipline Planning Questionnaire for teachers

    This document is useful in helping teachers and teams determine who much structure is needed for a particular group of students. 

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  • Progressive Consequences — Do They Work? By Randy Sprick

    "Many teachers in our school use a classroom management plan in which each student has a set of colored cards contained in a pocket chart located in a prominent place in the classroom. When a student misbehaves, a card is pulled from his or her pocket. Each card is a different color and represents a progression of consequences such as, when the green card is pulled it serves as a warning, when the yellow card is pulled the student loses recess, when the orange card is pulled it is a parental contact, and if the red card is pulled the student is sent to the office. What do you think about this kind of system?" 

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